Spotlight on Matthew Wallace

Matthew Wallace joined Piritahi in a permanent role around 2 months ago, but his face is one we’ve seen around the Quay St office for a lot longer than that. We caught up with Matthew to learn more about the pathway that led him to his newly appointed role as Land Development Manager in the Pre-Construction Team.

We hear you’ve been floating around Piritahi for the last 14 months, tell us more about that.

I was first brought into the Alliance to help with the Piritahi Economic Stimulation Taskforce Project (affectionately named ‘PEST’), where I oversaw due diligence reporting. I then held an interim Manager position for the Shovel Ready projects and eventually morphed into this permanent role as Land Development Manager, two months ago.


Put simply, what does the Land Development Team do and how do they fit into the Piritahi project cycle?

The Land Development Team is made up of specialised civil engineers and CAD designers. We are involved in project conception, design and assist in obtaining all necessary resource consents and approvals from Council. We then hand projects over to the construction team for delivery. Moving forward, I see opportunities for more collaboration, within the organisation, and also with our many stakeholders and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs). 


Something that really stands out to me at Piritahi is seeing individuals who truly are passionate about creating change and implementing Kainga Ora's vision for developing new social housing and regenerating neighbourhoods. There’s a very clear end purpose that we’re trying to achieve, and that really comes through everybody’s attitude to work.

How does the work you are doing now compare with your previous experiences?

Throughout my career I’ve worked in regulation and compliance at Council, I’ve been the NZ Director of the International Erosion Control Association, and I’ve spent the better part of 20 years at Woods, where I’ve predominantly been involved in delivering large-scale greenfield subdivisions. The issues we’re now working through at Piritahi are similar to those I’ve dealt with before, but with the added complexity of working in brownfield areas and interacting with build partners too.

Spotlight on Matthew Wallace

Matthew Wallace joined Piritahi in a permanent role around 2 months ago, but his face is one we’ve seen around the Quay St office for a lot longer than that. We caught up with Matthew to learn more about the pathway that led him to his newly appointed role as Land Development Manager in the Pre-Construction Team.

We hear you’ve been floating around Piritahi for the last 14 months, tell us more about that.

I was first brought into the Alliance to help with the Piritahi Economic Stimulation Taskforce Project (affectionately named ‘PEST’), where I oversaw due diligence reporting. I then held an interim Manager position for the Shovel Ready projects and eventually morphed into this permanent role as Land Development Manager, two months ago.


Put simply, what does the Land Development Team do and how do they fit into the Piritahi project cycle?

The Land Development Team is made up of specialised civil engineers and CAD designers. We are involved in project conception, design and assist in obtaining all necessary resource consents and approvals from Council. We then hand projects over to the construction team for delivery. Moving forward, I see opportunities for more collaboration, within the organisation, and also with our many stakeholders and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs). 


Something that really stands out to me at Piritahi is seeing individuals who truly are passionate about creating change and implementing Kainga Ora's vision for developing new social housing and regenerating neighbourhoods. There’s a very clear end purpose that we’re trying to achieve, and that really comes through everybody’s attitude to work.

How does the work you are doing now compare with your previous experiences?

Throughout my career I’ve worked in regulation and compliance at Council, I’ve been the NZ Director of the International Erosion Control Association, and I’ve spent the better part of 20 years at Woods, where I’ve predominantly been involved in delivering large-scale greenfield subdivisions. The issues we’re now working through at Piritahi are similar to those I’ve dealt with before, but with the added complexity of working in brownfield areas and interacting with build partners too.

Spotlight on Matthew Wallace

Matthew Wallace joined Piritahi in a permanent role around 2 months ago, but his face is one we’ve seen around the Quay St office for a lot longer than that. We caught up with Matthew to learn more about the pathway that led him to his newly appointed role as Land Development Manager in the Pre-Construction Team.

We hear you’ve been floating around Piritahi for the last 14 months, tell us more about that.

I was first brought into the Alliance to help with the Piritahi Economic Stimulation Taskforce Project (affectionately named ‘PEST’), where I oversaw due diligence reporting. I then held an interim Manager position for the Shovel Ready projects and eventually morphed into this permanent role as Land Development Manager, two months ago.


Put simply, what does the Land Development Team do and how do they fit into the Piritahi project cycle?

The Land Development Team is made up of specialised civil engineers and CAD designers. We are involved in project conception, design and assist in obtaining all necessary resource consents and approvals from Council. We then hand projects over to the construction team for delivery. Moving forward, I see opportunities for more collaboration, within the organisation, and also with our many stakeholders and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs). 


Something that really stands out to me at Piritahi is seeing individuals who truly are passionate about creating change and implementing Kainga Ora's vision for developing new social housing and regenerating neighbourhoods. There’s a very clear end purpose that we’re trying to achieve, and that really comes through everybody’s attitude to work.

How does the work you are doing now compare with your previous experiences?

Throughout my career I’ve worked in regulation and compliance at Council, I’ve been the NZ Director of the International Erosion Control Association, and I’ve spent the better part of 20 years at Woods, where I’ve predominantly been involved in delivering large-scale greenfield subdivisions. The issues we’re now working through at Piritahi are similar to those I’ve dealt with before, but with the added complexity of working in brownfield areas and interacting with build partners too.